Australia’s biggest international claim to culinary fame, Tetsuya’s has sliced, diced and whisked the global food scene into a frenzy and is riding high on top restaurant lists around the world.

Someone completing Tetsuya’s 13-course degustation disappointed is as rare as one of his delicate slivers of Wagyu beef.

Dining at Tetsuya’s is practically a right of passage for foodies and the Heritage-listed site is, to many, hallowed ground – even though you could walk past his restaurant’s non-descript front door and miss it entirely.

Throwing down $200 a head is the least it’ll cost you to set a foot in the door at the Kent St restaurant at the southern end of the Sydney’s CBD, but to thousands of diners that’s a small price to pay. You’ll never once see a menu; sit down and the food simply comes. Chilled cold corn soup with saffron and vanilla ice cream might be followed by tataki of veal with roasted eggplant and caviar, or perhaps a ravioli of octopus, rice and tomato.

Signature dishes like Petuna ocean trout served with konbu and fennel (or zucchini and non-pasteurised roe as the accompaniments do change), pack an unparalleled punch. The simple pleasure of this dish cannot be underestimated. It takes your breath way. It makes grown Neanderthals giggle at the sheer pleasure of it all. It makes the stiffest of food snobs pause for a moment as they realise they have never, and will never, eat a dish quite like it until they come here again.

Someone completing Tetsuya’s 13-course degustation disappointed is as rare as one of his delicate slivers of Wagyu beef. The minimalist surrounds might seem at odds with his mighty reputation but Tetsuya saves the extravagance for his food (and perhaps the food critics).

Did you know: In 1982 Tetsuya arrived in Sydney with little more than a suitcase and a love of food. He first worked as a kitchen hand at Fishwives in Surry Hills.

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