Those killjoys at the International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO) would have us believe the Southern Ocean’s upper boundary is actually much further south towards Antarctica. Well, sometimes you just have to say no.

Those killjoys at the International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO) would have us remove this one from the list of 100 Things You Can Only Do In Australia, since apparently the Southern Ocean isn’t where we think it is. They’d have us believe its upper boundary is actually much further south towards Antarctica, and that the waters off the bottom of Australia are merely extensions of the Pacific and the Indian. Well, sometimes you just have to say no. Sometimes you have to say we’re doing it this way because that’s the way we’ve always done it.

So here at AT we’re sticking by this claim: Cape Leeuwin in WA, Australia’s most southwesterly mainland point, is the only spot in the world where you can stand and watch the Southern and Indian Oceans colliding in all their glory. Take that, IHO.

While you’re visiting the region and debating the relative merits of having a governing body based in Monaco sitting there telling us how to draw our maps, there’s also a lovely lighthouse to visit (the tallest on mainland Australia), the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park to explore via the Cape to Cape Walk Track, and quite a few shipwrecks to ponder.

Where // Cape Leeuwin, which is too where the Southern and Indian Oceans meet, is around 320km south along the coast from Perth.

Did you know? // Leeuwin means lioness in Dutch and was the name of a galleon that mapped its way around WA’s southwest coast in 1622. Unfortunately, its logbooks were lost and to this day no-one even knows who the captain was.

 

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