Journey through the central Kimberley along the Gibb River Road, developed in the 1960s to transport cattle from outlying stations and spanning 660km across the state’s north. Note that it is only accessible between April and November due to the wet season.

Derby to Windjana National Park (145km)
After departing from Derby, the Kimberley’s first town, stop off to see the ruins of Lillimooloora Police Station before entering Windjana National Park and setting up camp at Windjana Gorge campground. Take a trip out to explore the spectacular Tunnel Creek – be sure to bring a powerful torch. dec.wa.gov.au/campgrounds

Windjana National Park to Mt Hart Wilderness Lodge (136km)
Continue into the Kimberley and stop off at Lennard Gorge for a swim before arriving at the historic Mt Hart Wilderness Lodge. Accommodation is available at the homestead or in the riverside campground. mthart.com.au

Mt Hart Wilderness Lodge to Bell Gorge (109km)
Enjoy swimming and exploring one of the most spectacular waterfalls along the Gibb River Road at Bell Gorge. There you can camp by Bell Creek at Silent Grove Campground. derbytourism.com.au/pages/bell-gorge-silent-grove/

Bell Gorge to Mornington Wilderness Camp (155km)
Spend some time exploring the upper reaches of the Fitzroy River at Mornington Wilderness Camp and discover Dimond Gorge and Sir John Gorge. You can stay in ensuite tents or camp at the campground. Get up early the next day and go for a trek with a member of staff from the Australian Wildlife Conservancy and try to spot a rare Gouldian finch. australianwildlife.org

Mornington Wilderness Camp to Mt Elizabeth (209km)
On the way stop for a dip at one of the many gorges, such as Galvans Gorge or Manning Gorge. Once at Mt Elizabeth, learn about the history behind the pioneering family-owned station and discover its magnificent waterholes, some of which feature Aboriginal rock art. mountelizabethstation.com

Mt Elizabeth to Drysdale River Station (160km)
Head to Drysdale River Station, the gateway to the Mitchell River National Park where visitors can explore the Mitchell and Merton Falls, Surveyors Pool, the Mitchell and King Edward Rivers and many historical Indigenous sites. If you’ve got extra cash to splash, take a morning charter flight over the coastal canyons of the Prince Regent River and along the dramatic Kimberley coastline. Stay at the station’s cabin-style accommodation or at one of two campgrounds available. dec.wa.gov.au/campgrounds; drysdaleriver.com.au

Drysdale River Station to Home Valley Station (236km)
Home Valley Station is an outback oasis nestled at the foot of the Cockburn Ranges. Featuring towering gorges and untouched beaches, it offers a range of guided tours and activities, such as gorge walks, barramundi fishing and cattle mustering. Spend the night there too, in the luxurious Grass Castles, at the Homestead Campground or Pentecost River Bush Camp. hvstation.com.au

Home Valley Station to El Questro Wilderness Park (49km)
Along this leg of the journey, cool off at popular swimming holes such as the Durack River Crossing – but avoid the Pentecost River as it’s frequented by saltwater crocodiles. Once at El Questro Wilderness Park, visit the thermal ponds at Zebedee Springs or take a boat down to the Chamberlain Gorge and try barramundi fishing. You can camp at El Questro Station. elquestro.com.au

El Questro to Kununurra (110km)
Kununurra was built in the 1960s to service the needs of the growing agricultural industry. Local sights include the huge Zebra Rock, with a unique striped pattern caused by layers of different minerals, and Kelly’s Knob, offering views of the town, farmland, Diversion Dam and Kununurra airport. But if you’d rather see something sparkly, Kimberley Fine Diamonds in town has one of Australia’s biggest selections of coloured diamonds, including pink ones mined at the Argyle Diamond Mine nearby. visitkununurra.com; kimberleydiamonds.com.au

 

MORE: Australian Traveller’s Ultimate Kimberley Guide

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