Swimming with sharks is so last year. In what is the future of sustainable tourism, there are four tours where divers take part in important scientific research like tagging sharks.

Swimming with sharks? So last year. This year you have to catch them. In what is the future of sustainable tourism, there are four tours to the very northern section of The Reef where divers take part in important scientific research like tagging sharks. And, because it’s scientific research conducted by Undersea Explorer in conjunction with the CSIRO, 20 lucky divers are taken to places that are absolutely off limits to regular tourists.

The first two days are spent in and around Raine Island, the largest Green Turtle rookery in the world, 280km from the tip of Cape York. In one night, around 20,000 turtles come ashore to lay eggs. Considering the island is only 32ha in total, with the majority of it shrubbery and of no interest to turtles, that’s more than one turtle for every square meter. And baby turtles bring sharks. Where you come in is with the tagging of the sharks, the purpose of which is to find the range and habits of the tiger shark.

Lead scientist Richard Fitzpatrick is on hand to explain what’s happening above and below the surface on up to four dives a day in this most remote and truly untouched area of the reef.
WHERE // 280km from the tip of Cape York. You can get a flight from Cairns with Undersea Explorer.

DID YOU KNOW? // In 1791, in what could be construed as ironic, the ship sent to pursue the mutineers of the Bounty, the HMS Pandora, came to grief just north of Raine Island.

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