How to see Tasmania’s stunning Southern Lights

Photographer Matt Glastonbury gets the green light - of the Aurora Australis.

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  • So glad to see an article that informs Australians of an amazing “birthright”: the aurora australis.

  • Greg Brown says:

    Great that someone is taking the time to explain that this phenomena exists in the Southern Hemisphere as it does in the North. I have seen the lights in both North and South and am amazed each time I have the privilege to watch the dancing sky. My only viewing of the Aurora Australia was way back when I was at school-1950’s. I remember this great red coloration in the Southern sky. Of course we did not know what it was until next day it was explained in the daily paper. I have never forgotten it and would love to see them again in the South.
    How regular are they appearing in the South. Could one plan a trip with some certainty of a viewing as they do in the North.
    Get the Tasmanians active in promoting this attraction.

  • Ann Dumenil says:

    Fantastic info on the Aurora Australia. I would be extremely grateful if I could get some more travel and accommodation info, as I would love to see this beautiful spectacle.
    Thanking you kindly.

  • Czar Mikol says:

    Hi there,

    I’m planning on making a trip down to Tasmania around September. Just trying to get an idea of what I will see. Is the aurora australis only colourful through a camera? To the naked eye, will it just be white?

    Thanks

  • Srimoyee says:

    Hi Steve,
    Last year I went to Hobart in the month of August. But as I was unaware of the fact of the Southern Lights,I missed that… If I visit there again,I will surely catch that up..
    Thank you for the information,
    Sri.

  • Dennis says:

    Thanks

  • Augustine Tan says:

    Please kindly enlighten.
    The above article seems to suggest that the aurora seen by the naked eye is a puff or white clouds, the colours are only seen through the lens of the camera.
    Can someone please clarify if we actually see the lights ‘dancing’ in the sky.
    Thanks

  • Les says:

    In response to Augustine. In Warrnambool, Victoria late July 1998 I clearly saw red and green rays and bands of ‘cloud’ or light in the night sky. The aurora Australis. To answer your question. The light is visible to the naked eye in color.

  • Connie Fanton says:

    I am 74 years old but I remember seeing the lights when I was a teenager. I am a south Australian And went to Woodfield high School. Lived in a district called Draper and was fortunate to see the lights one evening and in all it’s glory and the lights were green. After all these years can still remember this awesome sight but didn’t release what they were until many years later. Only saw them on one occasion but there they were for all to see with the naked eye. When I was a teenager the skies were clear, no smog or light pollution and the Milky Way could be seen every night. Have never been to Tasmania but a always wanted to now it’s a must. Would love to experience these lights again

  • Pauline Crookes says:

    What type of camera would I need? I currently only have a canon 700D

  • Molly says:

    Hi, my family would like to visit Tasmania to view the southern lights. May I know which part of Tasmania we need to stay in order to view the lights. Is there any public transport there from airport if we do not drive.

  • Luei Eng Yap says:

    When would be right timing to sight sounthern aurora in Tasmania and nice spot to sight?.its duration so that i could plan my holidays thanks

  • Debbie says:

    Thanks so much for you information. I’m heading to Tasmania next month (September 2016) and am so hoping that I am privileged enough to view this phenomena.

  • Molly Kong says:

    Do you think we can see the southern lights in mid December 2016?

    • Editor says:

      Hi Molly, It’s not peak season but it is possible – you may be lucky. If you are going to Tassie specifically to see the lights, winter is your best chance. Check out the resources on the article for more information. Good luck!

  • Val says:

    I am planning to go Tas in Jun 2017 with my kids. Do you think I will be able to see Southern lights with naked eyes?

  • Ashwini Mata says:

    Interested in knowing best times and locations in 2017 to see Southern Lights

  • Kathy Douglass says:

    Hi Guys, coming from Brisvegas we really need to plan air flights in advance. Would B.O,M. or another website be able to give me weekend dates for later this year that might be a possible shot at seeing the lights. We went to Cockle Creek August last year but it rained the entire weekend and it was a waning moon so not the best opportunity, appreciate guideance. thanks Kathy

  • Jason www.gowildimages.com says:

    Looks like the sky will be active tonight most of the night, but especially good from 1-4am. Unfortunately lots of cloud. Maybe Albany WA will get some clear sky though…

  • Tustuyu says:

    Much thank for information. Helpful indeed. Appreciate much. Tasmania beautiful place. Can article translate to

    • Editor says:

      Hi Tustuyu, We are looking into translating articles, but at the moment, no, we aren’t able to translate into other languages. Let us know if you have any specific questions and we’ll see what we can do. Regards,

  • Yunus Ghani says:

    I will be visiting Tasmania in mid July 2017. What are the chances of my seeing the southern lights and where would be the most likely place to see them at this time of the year?

    • Editor says:

      Hi Yunus, The darkness of winter is the best chance to see the Lights, but they are very unpredictable, as is nature’e way. Check out the article for some hotspots and websites to see updates. Good luck on your quest. Cheers

  • Judieth says:

    Will the moonlight affect the visual of the aurora??

  • Janet Jordan says:

    coming from W.A when is the best time to go to Tassie and see a few consistant nights. Any experience on the Northern nights wanting to do them as well. Thank you Janet